Archive | Technology

Online Learning Consortium Powell

Reflections from Online Learning Consortium “Accelerate”

The recent Online Learning Consortium (OLC) conference featured sessions focused on a variety of professional development and best practices-related topics, including: innovations, tools and technologies; institutional strategies and globalization; learner services and support; learning effectiveness; professional development and support; and research. Two that stood out were “The Power of Storytelling to Inspire and Engage” by Matthew Luhn from Pixar and “Human Exploration from Earth to Mars: Becoming Interplanetary” by Dr. Dava Newman from NASA and MIT.

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edsurge AI higher education Powell

EdSurge: Reflections on “Who Controls AI in Higher Education and Why It Matters” and the Impact on Education Science

EdSurge recently hosted a live thought leadership video discussion led by Jeffrey Young, an EdSurge senior fellow. This live video featured Dr. Mark Milliron, co-founder and chief learning officer of Civitas Learning and Dr. Candace Thille, a professor at Stanford University. The focus of the video was “Who Controls AI In Higher Education And Why It Matters.”

Since the transcript is available at the EdSurge site, my focus here is to reflect upon what I heard and concluded. I first discussed this topic as part of my related Educause posts, primarily because of the conference’s focus on technology and its essential and continually emerging role in higher education.

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technology educause student success Powell

The Educause 2018 Top 10 IT Issues for Student Success

Educause conducts an annual survey of its constituents prioritizing the top 10 information technology (IT) issues for the year. These issues are reported during a conference session that includes a panel of higher education executives who respond to these issues and priorities. (Pictures provided here were taken during the presentation at Educause during the Top Ten Issues sessions at their conference, held November 2, 2017 in Philadelphia.)

These issues were then categorized into four themes: students, data, planning and funding, and security, which were presented for group discussion.

 

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edsurge AI higher education Powell

Technology and Higher Ed: Learnings and Takeaways from Educause 2017 and EdSurge Live (Part 2)

At a recent Educause 2017 conference, I had the opportunity to listen to theoretical futurist, physicist and author Dr. Michio Kaku and also listened to an EdSurge conference on artificial intelligence. But what do all of these technological changes mean for us in higher education? In this post on the future of higher education, I will address the potential implications in three areas: program currency and relevance; preparing students for the future; and the changing role of faculty.

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technology educause student success Powell

Technology and Higher Ed: Learnings and Takeaways from Educause 2017 and EdSurge Live

As I discussed previously, the recent Presidents' Forum in part, and Educause 2017 in large part, focused on the topic of emerging and rapidly evolving learning technology. This week, I use an experiential learning framework approach to report my learnings and related reflections, i.e., what does this mean for higher education today and in the future? What do we do? What actions or follow-up are needed to advance these ideas?

Educause provided a wealth of informative and engaging ideas on multiple topics and areas. While attending Educause, I also had the opportunity to listen in on an EdSurge conference on artificial intelligence, hosted by EdSurge Editor Jeffrey Young and featuring Dr. Candace Thille from the Stanford Graduate School of Education and ‎Civitas Learning Co-Founder & Chief Learning Officer Dr. Mark Milliron. Noteworthy takeaways from each program included the following.

 

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digital literacy Powell

Digital Information Literacy: Preparing Students, Graduates, and Alumni for the Workforce

APUS programs are designed so that students can demonstrate proficiency in several learning areas upon completing their academic course of study. These proficiencies include applied learning, intellectual skill, specialized knowledge, broad knowledge, civic learning, and digital information literacy. While a focus on each of the learning areas required of graduates at all degree levels is essential, this post is focused on digital literacy proficiency.

By focusing on digital literacy, APUS aims to set our students apart from other graduates seeking employment and/or career advancement by developing and enhancing our student’s ability to communicate precisely and creatively using tools to engage, interact, and create visually effective and professional artifacts. Creativity and competence in the selection and safe, ethical use of digital resources are essential skills in the workplace for all employees – now and for the future. In fact, digital skills are emerging as a key job skill for the future – a future that is already here.

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