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family preparedness natural disasters Reynolds

Family Preparedness for Natural Disasters

With only about three months remaining in 2017, this year has proven to be a costly one in terms of natural disasters. So far this year, a total of 85 federal disaster declarations have been issued, dealing with everything from winter storms and flooding to hurricanes and wildfires. The unprecedented scale of these disasters has impacted many in our university community. In a matter of just two weeks, the country was hit by two major hurricanes, resulting in the evacuation of six million people in Texas and another 5.6 million in Florida (where I reside in Tampa). Both Harvey and Irma made landfall as Category 4 storms. And in the west, there are no less than 120 wildfires that have destroyed countless acres of forest and thousands of homes.

In a perfect world, everyone would be prepared anytime disaster strikes, but the reality is few disasters allow time for people to gather even the most basic necessities, thus making early planning a necessity. Whether it is wildfires in the west, tornadoes and flooding in the Midwest or hurricanes in the south and east coast, we all face the ever-present threat of disaster. Preparedness begins at home with our families, assuring they have the necessities needed for survival during long-term emergencies. While preparing my own family and home for the arrival of Irma, I spent the day sending out a series of tweets to help other members of our university community prepare their own families for disaster.

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digital literacy Powell

Digital Information Literacy: Preparing Students, Graduates, and Alumni for the Workforce

APUS programs are designed so that students can demonstrate proficiency in several learning areas upon completing their academic course of study. These proficiencies include applied learning, intellectual skill, specialized knowledge, broad knowledge, civic learning, and digital information literacy. While a focus on each of the learning areas required of graduates at all degree levels is essential, this post is focused on digital literacy proficiency.

By focusing on digital literacy, APUS aims to set our students apart from other graduates seeking employment and/or career advancement by developing and enhancing our student’s ability to communicate precisely and creatively using tools to engage, interact, and create visually effective and professional artifacts. Creativity and competence in the selection and safe, ethical use of digital resources are essential skills in the workplace for all employees – now and for the future. In fact, digital skills are emerging as a key job skill for the future – a future that is already here.

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Ed Albin eclipse

Reflections on the Total Eclipse

For millions of Americans, Monday, August 21, 2017, presented a rare opportunity to see a spectacular total eclipse of the sun. The swath of totality made a diagonal path across the country, from Oregon to South Carolina. People within its bicoastal path saw one of nature’s most fascinating spectacles.

Many members of the APUS Space Studies department (faculty and students alike) traveled about the country to view and photograph the eclipse. I experienced 1:42 of totality in Helen, Georgia. It is hard to believe how much can happen in that short period of time.

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Emergency management Portfolium Challenge Junkens

How My AMU Experience Helped Set the Course for My Emergency Management Career

My educational experience at American Military University has had a profound impact on my career in emergency management. Within a year of starting my master’s degree in homeland security, I was asked to teach at another university where I instructed ROTC. This opportunity allowed me to highlight the knowledge I gained from AMU and helped me form valuable relationships with the head of the criminal justice department and the director of public safety that facilitated subsequent employment.

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charlottesville imperative Karan Powell

The Charlottesville Imperative

Like most Americans, I was both saddened and disturbed by the recent tragedy in Charlottesville. While these events left me feeling aghast and somewhat speechless, I nonetheless felt compelled to write in solidarity with college, university presidents and leaders nationwide, and especially with President Teresa Sullivan and our nearby neighbors at the University of Virginia and greater Charlottesville. The violence and atrocities, including the death of an innocent bystander, are reprehensible. There is no place for hatred and violence of any kind on our campuses or in our communities and, in fact, these actions are contrary to the core values we value and uphold as both educators and as citizens.

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Duclos AMU Challenge

How I Rose to the AMU Challenge

I was an over-the-road truck driver for 12 years, mainly traveling from Minneapolis to Detroit on a dedicated run. Sometimes, I would finish my day at 2:00 or 3:00 in the afternoon with nothing else to do. While other drivers would go watch TV or play video games in their truck, I decided to go back to school. Since I could download the books onto either my iPad or laptop, I always had something to read while waiting for customers to load or unload me. When I would get home on weekends, I would already have all of the research done for the classes and was able to knock out the classwork in nothing flat.

I was able to finish both my bachelor’s and master’s degrees in transportation and logistics this way in about 3 ½ years. It took me only 14 months to complete my master’s degree, all while driving trucks. My hope was to be able to come off the road and have a college degree to fall back on.

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