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digital literacy Powell

Digital Information Literacy: Preparing Students, Graduates, and Alumni for the Workforce

APUS programs are designed so that students can demonstrate proficiency in several learning areas upon completing their academic course of study. These proficiencies include applied learning, intellectual skill, specialized knowledge, broad knowledge, civic learning, and digital information literacy. While a focus on each of the learning areas required of graduates at all degree levels is essential, this post is focused on digital literacy proficiency.

By focusing on digital literacy, APUS aims to set our students apart from other graduates seeking employment and/or career advancement by developing and enhancing our student’s ability to communicate precisely and creatively using tools to engage, interact, and create visually effective and professional artifacts. Creativity and competence in the selection and safe, ethical use of digital resources are essential skills in the workplace for all employees – now and for the future. In fact, digital skills are emerging as a key job skill for the future – a future that is already here.

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Emergency management Portfolium Challenge Junkens

How My AMU Experience Helped Set the Course for My Emergency Management Career

My educational experience at American Military University has had a profound impact on my career in emergency management. Within a year of starting my master’s degree in homeland security, I was asked to teach at another university where I instructed ROTC. This opportunity allowed me to highlight the knowledge I gained from AMU and helped me form valuable relationships with the head of the criminal justice department and the director of public safety that facilitated subsequent employment.

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Duclos AMU Challenge

How I Rose to the AMU Challenge

I was an over-the-road truck driver for 12 years, mainly traveling from Minneapolis to Detroit on a dedicated run. Sometimes, I would finish my day at 2:00 or 3:00 in the afternoon with nothing else to do. While other drivers would go watch TV or play video games in their truck, I decided to go back to school. Since I could download the books onto either my iPad or laptop, I always had something to read while waiting for customers to load or unload me. When I would get home on weekends, I would already have all of the research done for the classes and was able to knock out the classwork in nothing flat.

I was able to finish both my bachelor’s and master’s degrees in transportation and logistics this way in about 3 ½ years. It took me only 14 months to complete my master’s degree, all while driving trucks. My hope was to be able to come off the road and have a college degree to fall back on.

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Preparing Students for the Workplace

At the recent Eduventures Summit in Boston, we were asked to reflect upon a question in preparation for the for-profit leadership panel but it was never addressed, even though it may well be among the most important: How are we preparing our students for the workplace?

Today’s employers are seeking skills and mindsets in new employees that few institutions seem able to provide their graduates. Is this gap widening? Narrowing? Why, or why not? How do we, as institutions of higher education, respond to this skills gap? Are degrees the only solution? Is there a shorter-term credential at perhaps a lower cost? And how do these choices impact the business model of higher education?  

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Leveraging Education in the Workplace to Contribute to the Public Good

As part of my practicum for my Master of Public Health degree for American Military University, I participated in the #Bhepbfree campaign launched May 1, 2016, during Hepatitis B Awareness Month. The campaign resulted in 1.1 million Washington state residents being reached through social media and has become a prominent topic well beyond as many other states and organizations have similarly raised awareness about a disease that is rarely discussed. The agency that used this application is known as Thunderclap, a crowdsourcing tool that helps to amplify the message on a specified day and time across different social media platforms.

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The (Un)Written Lessons I Learned in Grad School

I was asked recently by a fellow military spouse whether earning a graduate degree was worth the time and effort involved. The question is very broad, and the answer truly depends on you and your career path.

For some professions, a higher degree is often mandatory. In others, factors such as self-improvement, the desire for in-depth knowledge and skills, or a change in career goals are some reasons why people decide to go for a graduate degree. The most popular motivation is to open up opportunities for career advancement and earn more money.

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